Asked by Anonymous Anonymous

I saw your post about not liking to talk to white people about feminism vegetarianism etc. could I ask why you feel this way? I am a white woman vegan and supportive of feminism having been a victim of sexism in my field of study. I believe that my opinion matters just as much as a non white woman's as I see us as equals. I don't feel that the color of a persons skin should dictate whether or not they get an opinion but their experiences and their respect for others. I'm not being hostile either

gutgroan:

i feel this way because, as the brown-skinned child of immigrants, white americans approach vegetarianism, feminism, and agnosticism with little or no understanding of what culture means and how it shapes brown identities. 

my white vegan and vegetarian friends are often derisive of people that eat meat or animal products, calling them lazy or cruel. but my mother’s recipes will die with her if i do not learn them and she has spent a lifetime perfecting them. food is one of the most important ways with which she shows her love. in this nation of white folk who have always looked down on us - and on her particularly - how can she assert her identity? surrounded by people who are actively trying to erase her, how can she be assured that her children will carry on her legacy? as an uneducated brown woman, in what ways can she mark the world and remind her offspring of their roots? 

white atheists are disgustingly condescending to religious folk. in an american setting, it becomes more than just simple condescension, it becomes imperialism. my family must mold their beliefs to suit white supremacy or be mocked for being stupid, backwards, and deluded. brown savages with primitive minds.

white feminism is poisonous beyond belief, refusing to accept the intersections of identities (racial, economic, etc.) in the name of a false greater good. you can google it. 

"I believe that my opinion matters just as much as a non white woman’s as I see us as equals. I don’t feel that the color of a persons skin should dictate whether or not they get an opinion but their experiences and their respect for others."

listen to me carefully: your opinion is not always necessary. if you want to be an ally to people of color, you must realize that in most cases, you are most helpful when you are silent. the idea that we are equals when my shout is not heard over your whisper is a lie. 

anotherafrica:

Mehdi Sefrioui | Handing a Pink Slip to Fashion’s Black List

Moroccan photographer Mehdi Sefrioui debuts his photographic fashion editorial on Another Africa celebrating the black body, black men and mens’ fashion. A homage to his another Africa, where equality, beauty and agency co-exist. View more images on anotherafrica.net .

Source | anotherafrica.net

All images courtesy of the artist. All rights reserved.

(via blackfashion)

Eromomen

Photography/Retouching: Joseph Alexander

Head Piece Designer/Stylist: Christine Clauson

Makeup: Lena w/ Sokora Vora

(Source: global-fashions, via blackfashion)

Of course I am not worried about intimidating men. The type of man who will be intimidated by me is exactly the type of man I have no interest in.

—Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie   (via chubby-bunnies)

(Source: ichbindeinesylvia, via gutgroan)

I mean there’s a certain finality about a movie, when it’s done it’s done – that raised eyebrow in that moment will always be that raised eyebrow. Whereas a play only lives as a blueprint for a performance on any given night. There’s a reason you can eat popcorn and watch a movie and you can’t do that in the theatre. Theatre you have to lean in, you have to tune your ear to the stage and participate…I respond to heat. And blood. And humanity. The cold experience is not for me. I’ve always enjoyed all the real people in a room together in the theatre.

—Tracy Letts (x)

(Source: fuckyeahgreatplays)

saharaayahniv:


Jeneil Williams by Txema Yeste // Numéro February 2014

wow i love this. 

saharaayahniv:

Jeneil Williams by Txema Yeste // Numéro February 2014

wow i love this. 

(Source: highkeygay, via blackfashion)

I think soon I won’t have a corner in me safe from you.

—Solness in Henrik Ibsen’s The Master Builder (trans. Rolf Fjelde)

(Source: injusticeworth)

tastefullyoffensive:

Everyday Objects Blended With Simple Sketches by Javier Perez [via]

Previously: Famous Paintings on Bread

(via mugglegirl)

digbicks:

The Arrow of Time, Diego Goldberg

Every year on June 17 — that’s his anniversary with his wife — Goldberg takes a portrait of everyone in his family, and adds it to this project. There are no formal preparations, so the photos reflect the way each person looked on that day. There is no fancy equipment either. Goldberg uses his Nikon — at first he used film, but now he shoots with digital — to take the pictures. "Even if everybody has a camera, and anybody can do it, nobody thought of such a simple idea." But, he adds, "sometimes the simplest ideas are the best."

Diego says he gets mail every day from all over the world, and viewers express one of two things: “I will do it when I form a family” or “How come I didn’t think of it?” In response, Diego says: "Find your own angle and stick to it. After a couple of years you’ll see it was worth the effort." 

(via porthaifa)

When you read Samuel Beckett.

gradexpectations:

image

deemah122:

shinjigraham:

elithewalrus:

GEt IT RIGHT PEOPLE!

i cant believe someone corrected a meme

That is why I’m laughing

deemah122:

shinjigraham:

elithewalrus:

GEt IT RIGHT PEOPLE!

i cant believe someone corrected a meme

That is why I’m laughing

(via sonickitty)

period by KRUNK Interactive